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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the president about it. congresswoman kathy mcmorris rogers of washington state is the party's conference chair in the house. >> we're going to either succeed together or we're going to fail together. the president is calling for higher taxes as well as more spending. he's calling for another stimulus. at a time when we need tax reform. we need to be looking at... and the republicans have put forward tax reform that includes closing the loopholes, eliminating some of those tax credits, that will actually impact the wealthiest. >> reporter: some republicans said the boehner plan goes too far in taxing the well-off. south carolina senator jim demint, a staunch fiscal conservative, blasted the plan on twitter today. he said speaker boehner's offer of an $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. but the senate's democratic majority leader harry reid warned republicans against listening to such voices. >> you can't let these negotiations be dictated by the tea party. our guiding principle should be the views of the vast majority of the american p
has the latest on washington's impasse on taxes and spending. >> ifill: then we examine nato's decision to send patriot anti- missile systems to turkey, as fears grow that syrian chemical weapons could cross the border. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown talks to mcclatchy newspapers' egypt correspondent nancy youssef about the massive antigovernment protests in cairo today. >> ifill: we continue our series of conversations about the fiscal cliff. tonight we hear from economist paul krugman. >> i don't think there's going to be much of a deal. i think there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome. >> woodruff: from haiti, fred de sam lazaro reports on the efforts to stem a deadly cholera epidemic that began after the 2010 earthquake. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to author and journalist tom ricks about what he describes as the decline of american military leadership. >> today nobody gets credit for anything and mediocrity is accepted as a core value in the performance of generals. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has b
is that? tom foreman is in washington to speculate. good morning. >> reporter: hi, carroll. we don't know what that means. there's been speculation it will have something to do with mental health issues because certainly at a lot of local levels people talked about that on the republican side. people on the conservative side saying that has to be addressed as much, perhaps more than the gun issue itself. so we're expecting that may be the direction to go but the truth is we don't really know. what we do know is that the nra was quiet immediately after this. they often are after such incidents and they usually say as they did this time out of respect for the community and the family involved but now that a little bit of time has passed what we would certainly expect here is that there would be a clear message to the white house and to others which is be careful about overreacting at this point because the nra will push back and certainly they have proven that politically they have the power to do it not only nationally but certainly at the state level. carol? >> tom foreman reporting live
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
in the rotunda. friday at 10:30 p.m. eastern, the public memorial will be held at the washington national cathedral. >> senator kay bailey hutchison, republican of texas, is retiring from the senate after serving four terms. she will be replaced by republican ted cruz, a former texas solicitor general. she delivers her farewell remarks on the senate floor. this is 25 minutes. week there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capitol bringing with the laughter and the anticipation of our seasons happiest time. but in just one weekend, a sadness have said in with the news of the massacre of innocent children in newtown, connecticut, followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. so i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with a heavy heart for those who have been lost just in the last few days. i do want to thank you for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both senses, on both sides of this room are filled with my staff
vacation short and heading back to washington before we fall off of the fiscal cliff . can a deal be reached. >> a deadly winter storm unleashing snow and tornados . now thousands ever cleaning up and holiday travelers are stuck. i am tracking where the storm ised hading next. >> thank you, rick. take the gift card and hit the stores this morning. wait until "fox and friends" is over and then leave. "fox and friends" begins right now. "fox and friends". >> gretchen: good morning, i am gretchen carlson we are joined by clayton morris . rick as well . these are great guys, but clayton, because he is a tech guru of folks news and here to help all of us today. >> tech support this morning f. you have tech-related questions. send them and i will attempt to answer them all. i answered all of them. my wife said what are you doing on twitter? i said i am helping me. >> gretchen: we have big storms brewing and rick, you are aptly sitting to the right of me and you will help people get out of town. >> 30 tornados and a big one in mobile, alabama and more tornados and a blizzard. i will try
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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